October 20, 2014

aworldofsound:

Glitch Commissions

Hello everyone!  After a little bit of nervous nail-biting and several months of practice, I’ve decided to open up some glitch commissions!  These glitches will be of the pixel sorting variety and will incorporate some unique parameters I wrote as well as a mild amount of editing to smooth some edges appropriately.  Here’s a bullet list of some facts and stuff?

  • $20 get you 3 glitched images from 1 submitted template
  • Please keep the images to a PNG, BMP, or JPG format
  • Only submit images that you possess legitimate ownership of: (I will gladly glitch any art or photo of yours, but don’t just nab people’s work off Flickr cause you think it will look cool)
  • Any other details I’ll be more than happy to cover, just ask!

The reason why I’m offering 3 different images from a single submission is so that I can increase the odds of creating a glitch that you really enjoy despite the inherently random nature of this kind of art!  Of course, I will be open to slight changes if they are possible.  Above all else, I want to make sure you are satisfied with at least one of the glitches I make, but hopefully all three.  All I ask is that you keep in mind how some aspects of glitches I can control, but other aspects are awesome because I can’t control them. Thanks for the read and as always, reblogs are SUPER appreciated!

Send me a message in my ask box if you’re interested!

Mark is a good egg. I’m going to see about drawing something for him to glitch sometime soon so if you appreciate seeing more of me actually drawing, you should think about getting some of your own work glitched!

October 17, 2014
Deadshirt’s HORROR MONTH: Repulsion
(A short essay I wrote for Deadshirt about Repulsion, one of my favorite horror movies. Made in 1965, its socially conscious cinematography crafted effective scares out of the male gaze and male entitlement. It’s certainly a movie we should talk about more.)
When Roman Polanski’s Repulsion was released in 1965, the tagline that accompanied the American theatrical poster was, “The nightmare world of a virgin’s dreams becomes the screen’s shocking reality!!” as you can see in the picture above. It’s a sensational and immensely pulpy combination of words that simplifies the movie’s plot and themes to their most shallow interpretation: a woman, repulsed by the opposite sex, has her worst fears realized. I’m not sure how they did things in the 60s, but 21st century attitudes towards stories of women and sexual violence have fortunately started to veer away from the basic “sex sells” attitude of that bygone era. As a more mature culture, we are aware now more than ever of certain cracks that run through society–abuse, mental illness, sexism–and the importance of narratives that bring them into the light. Repulsion is a story of a victim of abuse, faced with the everyday horror of the male gaze and male entitlement. We can never know what general audiences took away from Repulsion back in the 60s, but the movie still works as a modern horror, perhaps even more so, because the social ills from where it draws its scares are more broadly recognized today.
(Read more on Deadshirt)

Deadshirt’s HORROR MONTH: Repulsion

(A short essay I wrote for Deadshirt about Repulsion, one of my favorite horror movies. Made in 1965, its socially conscious cinematography crafted effective scares out of the male gaze and male entitlement. It’s certainly a movie we should talk about more.)

When Roman Polanski’s Repulsion was released in 1965, the tagline that accompanied the American theatrical poster was, “The nightmare world of a virgin’s dreams becomes the screen’s shocking reality!!” as you can see in the picture above. It’s a sensational and immensely pulpy combination of words that simplifies the movie’s plot and themes to their most shallow interpretation: a woman, repulsed by the opposite sex, has her worst fears realized. I’m not sure how they did things in the 60s, but 21st century attitudes towards stories of women and sexual violence have fortunately started to veer away from the basic “sex sells” attitude of that bygone era. As a more mature culture, we are aware now more than ever of certain cracks that run through society–abuse, mental illness, sexism–and the importance of narratives that bring them into the light. Repulsion is a story of a victim of abuse, faced with the everyday horror of the male gaze and male entitlement. We can never know what general audiences took away from Repulsion back in the 60s, but the movie still works as a modern horror, perhaps even more so, because the social ills from where it draws its scares are more broadly recognized today.

(Read more on Deadshirt)

October 7, 2014

The Whole Loaf: Terror in Resonance

(Yup, still doing that anime podcast thing. Mouthful of Toast! Check it out! I just wrote up our first written review for the site and it’s a whopping 2.3k words long. Probably the longest thing I’ve ever written and huge step up in terms of my review writing. Let us know what you think!)

During times of political uncertainty, art can effectively unpack the dual threads of hope and worry that run through contemporary public opinion. Shinichiro Watanabe’s Terror in Resonance is one such politically-minded work and also the most plainly political anime that I can recall since Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex finished ten years ago. It is the type of show that some people will love or hate solely on the basis of its politically-charged subject matter. As such, one of the first things we must do in order to correctly judge the series is to understand the political situation that the series aims to address and what it means to say.

(Read more on Mouthful of Toast)

October 4, 2014
Goddamn, Mr. Marchione. This is ~so good~

Goddamn, Mr. Marchione. This is ~so good~

(Source: jonmarchione)

September 7, 2014
sterfler:

sic

Every now and then, a colorful horse.

sterfler:

sic

Every now and then, a colorful horse.

August 16, 2014
tomatored:

A toast.
And a Thank You to tggp for the kind words about the school bag picture. 
And for liking it enough to mention it on your podcast.
And to supitscarrie for being generally cool and in the know enough to relay the vital information that led to this.
Go listen to their podcast here→ Mouthful of Toast: A biweekly podcast about anime, manga, and conventions. It’s cool.
***
Everyone else: 
Thank you! Sincerely.
I was not expecting such a big response to that picture, but I am pleasantly surprised. 
♥

Small world stuff always gets me really bubbly and this instance is no exception. The only reason I was able to find tomatored, the wonderful artist who drew Usagi’s school bag, was because my podcast co-host knew who she was after I mentioned the piece in our latest episode. Little did I know that she would end up listening to the podcast episode in question!
Now, here we are: all a little closer, with a net gain of warm feelings and one lovely illustration of jelly toast. Thanks, tomatored!

tomatored:

A toast.

And a Thank You to tggp for the kind words about the school bag picture. 

And for liking it enough to mention it on your podcast.

And to supitscarrie for being generally cool and in the know enough to relay the vital information that led to this.

Go listen to their podcast here→ Mouthful of Toast: A biweekly podcast about anime, manga, and conventions. It’s cool.

***

Everyone else: 

Thank you! Sincerely.

I was not expecting such a big response to that picture, but I am pleasantly surprised. 

Small world stuff always gets me really bubbly and this instance is no exception. The only reason I was able to find tomatored, the wonderful artist who drew Usagi’s school bag, was because my podcast co-host knew who she was after I mentioned the piece in our latest episode. Little did I know that she would end up listening to the podcast episode in question!

Now, here we are: all a little closer, with a net gain of warm feelings and one lovely illustration of jelly toast. Thanks, tomatored!

August 11, 2014
tomatored:

Tsukino Usagi’s school bag ♥
I made this for the art show at Otakon this weekend. I’ve been wanting to draw bags and their contents since seeing Yuko Uramoto’s manga Kaban Toridori.

This was my absolute favorite piece in the Otakon art show.

tomatored:

Tsukino Usagi’s school bag ♥

I made this for the art show at Otakon this weekend. I’ve been wanting to draw bags and their contents since seeing Yuko Uramoto’s manga Kaban Toridori.

This was my absolute favorite piece in the Otakon art show.

August 10, 2014
shaburdies:

MADOKA MAGICA

I buy prints and posters a lot more rarely these days; chalk it up to my slowly discovering that wall space is indeed a limited resource. Of course, exceptions must always be made for the stuff and the people that inspire you. This year at Otakon, I finally got to meet the lovely shaburdies, whose style is simply everything lively, fun, and welcoming. She has a wonderful mind and a beautiful heart and I’m glad to have her print to frame.

shaburdies:

MADOKA MAGICA

I buy prints and posters a lot more rarely these days; chalk it up to my slowly discovering that wall space is indeed a limited resource. Of course, exceptions must always be made for the stuff and the people that inspire you. This year at Otakon, I finally got to meet the lovely shaburdies, whose style is simply everything lively, fun, and welcoming. She has a wonderful mind and a beautiful heart and I’m glad to have her print to frame.

August 3, 2014

withoutwhy:

I finally watched the first episode of the second series of Utopia on Channel 4 and I fell deeply in love with how they firstly used an old looking camera for the entire episode (which is set in the 70s) and then managed to absolutely ace the composition within the square. So I fancied doing a couple of little redraws of the bath scene.

I think I prefer Rose Leslie in this than in GoT..

I simply have to reblog this – withoutwhy is one of the rare artists I’ve found who makes real the style I can only dream of having. It also goes without saying that the work these artists do make my dreams seem modest.

July 31, 2014

Boyhood: Days in the Life

How do you chronicle a life? Director Richard Linklater’s latest film is an attempt at tackling that riddle, which succeeds in balancing the breadth of such an undertaking and the intimacy of its results. Filmed over twelve years with the same actors, the production of Boyhood is already the stuff of film legend. The fact that this film even exists is yet more proof that Linklater the director is a master of the form. It is even more impressive, then, that Linklater the storyteller saw the process as but a means to an end. Over twelve curated years, Linklater tells a story of such specificity and veracity that it could not be anything but modest. Ultimately, Boyhood is the simple story of a colorful, believable, and relatable life that is told in the best way possible.

(Read more on Deadshirt)